Saturday, July 22, 2017

Saturtainment: Muttley becomes a stuntman (1969)

Magnificent Muttley sees himself as a "Movie Stuntman" in this short-short episode. Director Dick Dastardly (Paul Winchell) tries to sabotage Muttley's efforts, but......



A rare case where Zilly (Don Messick, also the voice of Muttley) is in the mix, in this case as a cameraman. It's just unfortunate that these shorts were way too short, but when you consider they also had the Wing Dings gags to fill out the half hour of Dastardly & Muttley......

By the way, Dick & Muttley will return to DC Comics in September in an all new series.

"Movie Stuntman" gets an A.

Toon Legends: Popeye in Childhood Daze (1960)

When Professor O. G. Whatashnozzle creates a machine that can send a chicken back into the egg, Brutus (Jackson Beck) decides to use it on Popeye (Jack Mercer) so he can have Olive (Mae Questel) all to himself. Here's "Childhood Daze", produced by Larry Harmon, and directed by Paul Fennell.



Kind of odd seeing Popeye (and later, Brutus) with adult faces on infant bodies. I guess the Professor has to go back to the drawing board.

As previously noted, Harmon employed some future talents from Filmation, including Hal Sutherland, Erv Kaplan, and musical director Gordon Zahler, who later worked as a music supervisor not just for Filmation, but also for Ivan Tors.

Rating: C.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Toonfomercial: Remember the Oscar Mayer jingle? (1965)

Today, Oscar Mayer is part of the ever growing conglomerate that is now known as Kraft Heinz. Yeah, mergers are a thing again. I guess they did away with anti-monopoly laws, but never made it public. Digressing. Anyway, back in 1965, this next ad made its debut, and would resurface in the 90's when Nick at Nite's TV Land debuted and began running "retromercials".



Too bad this hasn't been updated for the here & now.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Toonfomercials: The Jack Davis collection (1960's-85)

Artist Jack Davis is best known for his work on Mad Magazine and about a bazillion covers of TV Guide way back in the day, plus some advertising.

Starting back in the mid-60's somewhere, Davis' art was brought to life in a series of ads for a number of sponsors. The following block features:

McCracken Apple Chips (1985): Frito-Lay tried out this particular brand, using an apple-headed detective and his girl Friday. Gary Owens is the announcer at the end of the clip.

Gillette Trac II razor blades (1971): Jackson Beck narrates this one, in which a wicked Shadow gives guys the infamous 5:00 Shadow. Unfortunately, Procter & Gamble, Gillette's parent company, has discontinued this brand of blades.

Chex Cereals: Ruth Buzzi (Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In) is credited as the singing housewife in this spot, which may be from the 60's or early 70's.

2 spots for Utica Club, including a hysterical bit with a matador and a bull sharing a round of the suds. Jackson Beck is heard as the bull.

It Should've Been on a Saturday: Malibu U (1967)

Here's a teen-centric ABC variety show that Dick Clark had nothing to do with.

Malibu U. was geared toward fans of Clark's American Bandstand and its related series, such as Where The Action Is, but lasted just 7 weeks in the summer of 1967. The problem? ABC placed it on Friday nights, rather than on Saturday mornings, where it could've been used to greater effect.

Actor-singer Rick Nelson (ex-The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet) served as host to an eclectic lineup of musical acts and assorted guest stars. Choreographer Bob Banas' dance troupe included a future sci-fi icon in Erin Gray (later of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century & Silver Spoons.

Now, I never saw the show, so there won't be a rating. This episode features the 5th Dimension, Freddy Cannon and John Astin (ex-The Addams Family), billed as "The One Man Comedy Team", this after subbing for Frank Gorshin as the Riddler on Batman during the 1966-7 season.




Wikipedia's entry claims, incorrectly, that Four Star had a hand in the series, when it's clear that they didn't. They tried a variety show a couple of years earlier, the syndicated Hollywood A Go-Go, which was a failure.

Teenage Toons: To Thing Or Not To Thing (1979)

After our last Thing entry, regular correspondent Goldstar noted that there was a reason why the self-proclaimed idol of millions (Joe Baker) used a ring to switch from teenager Benjy Grimm (Wayne Morton) and back again.

"To Thing Or Not To Thing" offers some insight. By some unknown means, Ben was de-aged into a teenager, and stripped of his strength, which he could only access with the use of the two-part Thing Ring---which vanishes in the course of this particular fable.

After being advised by Professor Harkness (John Stephenson) to stay in the lab for 8 hours after an experiment meant to restore his adult self to full-time status, Benjy is goaded into going on a ski trip with snooty Ronald Radford (John Erwin). Chaos follows, of course.



Kelly had to hold back the tears, but that would be the first hint that there were signs of affection toward Benjy. The full origin in this continuity was never established, it would appear.

Rating: C.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Toonfomercial: A summer break message from ABC Afterschool Special (1973)

After ABC's Afterschool Special wrapped its first season, the network ran this ad, mostly during primetime, during the summer of 1973 to promote the fact that the anthology series would return that fall.

Of course, the underlying reason I'm doing this is to have something that uses the series' original, synthesizer driven theme song.....

Saturday Morning's Forgotten Heroes: Isis in Fool's Dare (1975)

It's been a while since we scoped The Secrets of Isis.

Student Cindy Lee (Joanna Pang) takes a dare to enter a junkyard, and encounters a gang of car thieves who'd earlier stolen a car belonging to Andrea Thomas (Joanna Cameron), aka Isis. Typical Filmation live-action fare of the period.



Albert Reed (Principal Barnes) had previously appeared on Chase, then took up a career in law enforcement of his own, working as a security guard. Who'dathunk?

Rating: A-.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Toon Legends: Popeye in Jeep Tale (1960)

One familiar trope of Jack Kinney's run producing and directing Popeye was having Swee'pea (Mae Questel) coax Popeye (Jack Mercer) into telling some stories.

One such case is "Jeep Tale", in which Beatrix Potter's Tale of Peter Rabbit is sent up, with Eugene the Jeep subbing for Peter Rabbit.



Predictable fluff.

Rating: A-.

Game Time: Captain Kangaroo on What's My Line? (1974)

Goodson-Todman figured that kids were watching the syndicated What's My Line? with their parents if they weren't in school, or, in summer reruns, playing in the yard. To that end, Captain Kangaroo (Bob Keeshan) was brought on as a mystery guest in this 1974 episode helmed by Larry Blyden.



Good stuff.

Rating: A.

Rein-Toon-Ation: The Thing Meets The Clunk (1979)

The Thing (Joe Baker) finds himself having to corral a runaway robot whose programming isn't quite as complete as his creator had intended. Professor Quimby (Paul Winchell) may be absent-minded, but good natured. His creation, though, is a work in progress. Here's "The Thing Meets The Clunk":



It was never really implied that Kelly (Noelle North) was Benjy Grimm's girlfriend in this series, although she and her scientist father (John Stephenson) were the only ones who were privy to Benjy's dual identity.

Rating: B--.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Summertainment: Monkees at the Movies (1967)

From season 1 of The Monkees:

The guys are chillin' on the beach when they're recruited by a director (Jerry Lester) to be extras for a beach movie starring Frankie Catalina (Bobby Sherman). However, Catalina's success has gone to his head, so the Monkees decide to chop his ego down to size.

Here's "Monkees at the Movies":



The version of "Valleri" heard here was the original studio track, not the eventual hit single.

Bobby Sherman, of course, would stick with Screen Gems for 2 series of his own, Here Come The Brides and Getting Together, while forging his own career on the charts.

Rating: B.

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Animated World of DC Comics: Superman vs. the Prankster (Triple Play, 1988)

Superman (Beau Weaver) has to save the National Pastime when the Prankster (guest star Howard Morris) teleports a baseball stadium and the two teams playing in the World Series to a remote island as part of an elaborate revenge plot. Here's "Triple Play":



If Jimmy Olsen's voice sounds familiar, it belongs to Mark Taylor, who was Firestorm on Super Friends: The Legendary Super Powers Show & Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians. Same basic vocal pattern.

While the World Series is still 3 months away, I figured, why wait?

Rating: A-.

Getting Schooled (again): The New Mickey Mouse Club (1977)

By 1976, the original Mickey Mouse Club was back in syndication. I remember this well because while it aired on the same station that carried it when it aired on ABC (1955-9), it was also airing on cable, and the cable company blacked out the feed from WNEW in New York much of the time, subbing in a text-only news feed from Reuters, which was available at the time.

In January 1977, Disney decided to reopen the Mickey Mouse Club, with a brand-new, culturally diverse cast, a disco reworking of the classic theme song, and, instead of new serials, simply split up pre-existing movies into multi-part, week-long serials. They had already re-edited some movies into two-parters for NBC's Wonderful World of Disney on Sundays to create inventory.

Unfortunately, The New Mickey Mouse Club had just 26 weeks (130 daily episodes) of original material before Disney ended production, but reruns would continue for 2 more years. Why? It wasn't airing in as many markets as reruns of the original series. The format was essentially the same, with a different theme each day of the week, but this was a case where Disney had sabotaged itself. Viewers preferred the reruns and cherished the  memories of childhood favorites like Annette Funnicello, who by 1977 was now shilling for Skippy peanut butter.

The cast was largely forgotten except for two. Lisa Whelchel and Julie Piekarski would later resurface on The Facts of Life, only for Piekarski to leave early in the series' run.

Here's a sample clip:



The most successful incarnation of the Mickey Mouse Club was still to come, leaving its biggest impact on the world of pop music. We'll talk about that another day.

No rating.

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Tooniversary: Voyage to the Inner World (Space Sentinels, 1977)

Space Sentinels turns 40 this year. To mark the occasion, let's take a look back with the episode, "Voyage to the Inner World".



I have no memory of seeing this one. No rating.

It Should've Been on a Saturday: The Mickey Mouse Club (1955)

In the 50's, ABC may perhaps have been the only network that programmed shows for children & teenagers on weekday afternoons. For the teeny-boppers, there was, of course, American Bandstand, which would later move to Saturday afternoons and continue into the 80's.

For the younger kiddo's, there was the equally legendary Mickey Mouse Club, which, like Bandstand did at the time, ran 5 days a week. Had ABC and/or Disney thought of it, maybe a 6th day, Saturday, would've been added. Had that happened, maybe the series could've gone past 4 seasons.

Host Jimmie Dodd basically was an adult supervisor for the Mouseketeers, whose roster included such future stars as Don Grady (later of My Three Sons), Annette Funicello, Sherry Alberoni (later better known for her voice work, i.e. Super Friends & Josie & the Pussycats), and Bobby Burgess (The Lawrence Welk Show). Each day had a specific day, such, as, for example, "Guest Star Day", from whence we get the following clip, which features actor-singer Cliff Edwards, aka Ukelele Ike, aka the original voice of Jiminy Cricket.



17 years after the series ended, Disney re-released it in syndication, so that parents could share their experiences with their kids. That led to the first reincarnation of the series, which we'll discuss another day. Likewise, the last and most successful incarnation will be addressed down the road.

Rating: A.

Friday, July 14, 2017

Animated World of DC Comics: Super Friends vs. Raven (Menace of the White Dwarf, 1973)

Time to take a trip back to 1973 with the Super Friends.

A white dwarf, manipulated by a vengeful alien named Raven (Casey Kasem in a dual role), begins stealing various objects, and relocating them, including a two-seat bicycle belonging to Marvin (Frank Welker). Superman (Danny Dark) sent Raven to prison some years earlier, and now knows Raven is looking for revenge......

Here's "Menace of the White Dwarf":



This Raven, of course, was a 1-shot villain who never appeared in the comics, and won't be confused with the later, female Raven of the Teen Titans. Dark doubles as the judge who sentenced Raven to prison.

Rating: B-.

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Toonfomercial: Remember the Nutter Butter Man? (1970s?)

Nabisco introduced Nutter Butter peanut butter sandwich cookies in 1969. That might actually have been when this next animated commercial first appeared.......



I think the Nutter Butter man is supposed to be Nabisco's answer to Willy Wonka, but don't hold me to that. Too bad he's not around anymore, although the cookies still are.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Literary Toons: Cyrano (1974)

From season 2 of the ABC Afterschool Special:

Cyrano is a loose adaptation of the life of Cyrano de Bergerac (Jose Ferrer). I'm sure you know the story from various live-action and animated adaptations, including Mr. Magoo's take on it nearly a full decade earlier. A then-unknown Joan Van Ark co-stars as Roxanne.

Unfortunately, all that is available now is this trailer, meant to promote a VHS release.



1988 was the year this was released on VHS. Hanna-Barbera produced this one, one of a half-dozen entries during this season, most of them in live-action form.

No rating. I have no memory of seeing this one.

Summertainment: Come On In! The Water's Pink (1968)

The Pink Panther heads off to the beach, where he makes a monkey out of a muscle-head. Here's "Come On In! The Water's Pink":



I think we've seen some of the same gags in some Road Runner cartoons (you know which ones I mean). Still, good fun for a summer afternoon.

Rating: A.

Monday, July 10, 2017

Saturday Morning's Forgotten Heroes: Dino Boy in Danger River (1966)

I've heard of shooting the rapids, but this is ridiculous.

Dino Boy and Ugg try to take a native back to his village,  but must navigate "Danger River":



Now, that's an obstacle course.

Rating: B-.

Sunday, July 9, 2017

From Primetime to Daytime: The Pizza Head Show (1993)

In the early 90's, Pizza Hut sought to attract younger customers, particularly tweens and teens. The gimmick they hit on turned out to be a radical revamp of an old Saturday Night Live skit.

The Pizza Head Show was a series of ads for Pizza Hut that ran from 1993-7, from Mr. Bill creator Walter Williams. Shoot, Pizza Head even sounds like Mr. Bill. Sixteen commercials, mostly for promotional giveaways, were produced over the course of four years. It so happens that an enterprising YouTube poster collected them all.



I think now you know where the creators of Uncle Grandpa got the idea for that sentient slice of pizza.......

Rating: B-.

From Comics to Toons: Spider-Man in The Vulture Has Landed (1981)

From Spider-Man's 1981 solo series:

The Vulture (Don Messick) begins kidnapping scientists. When Peter Parker inexplicably loses his clothes, he borrows an outfit from his friend, Harry Osborn, the son, of course, of Norman Osborn (Green Goblin). However, Vulture mistakes Peter for Harry and kidnaps Peter, which may turn out to be a big mistake.......



The original Vulture, Adrian Toomes, didn't appear in the 1967-70 series, so this would be his TV debut. Oh, there was a Vulture in 1967, but it was the 2nd one, Blackie Drago.

Rating: B.


Saturday, July 8, 2017

Saturday Morning's Forgotten Heroes: Skyhawks in Dog Fight (1969)

It's been a while since we checked in with the Wilson family of Skyhawks.

In "Dog Fight", Steve (Casey Kasem) is the victim of sabotage when business rival Buck Devlin's aides rig his plane.



Devlin might've been able to talk his way out of trouble, but today, I doubt he could get away with it with any consistency.

Rating: B.

Friday, July 7, 2017

Toonfomercial: Kellogg's tries reinventing Milton the Toaster (1996)

Nearly 30 years after creating Milton the Toaster as a mascot for Pop-Tarts, Kellogg's came up with a new model, whose eyes are inside the toaster, and whose mouth is one of the slots. Gilbert Gottfried (Aladdin) voices the new, nameless toaster.



El flopp-o, as this toaster's attitude was the pits.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Toon Legends: Doctor Pink (1978-9)

The Pink Panther takes a job at a hospital as a humble, but of course bumbling, janitor, yet he dreams of being "Doctor Pink". The copyright says 1978, but it didn't come out until a year later, and likely aired on ABC.



The Walter Mitty-esque daydreams have been a common ream for the Panther over the years. If you've seen one variant, you've seen them all.

Rating: B.

Rein-Toon-Ation: Pac-Man & the Ghostly Adventures (2013)

Pac-Man returned to action in 2013's Pac-Man & the Ghostly Adventures, currently airing as part of Sinclair Broadcasting's Kids Click package.

The series initially aired on DisneyXD here in the US, and concurrently in Japan, which got one extra season out of the series, in addition to some holiday themed episodes that didn't air here, although they could, since the series is also streaming on Netflix.

The biggest difference between this series and the game on which it's based is the premise that the ghosts are secretly pals with ol' Pac, including Pinky, a female ghost with a crush on Pac-Man. Instead of being on what seemed to be Earth in the 1982 ABC series, Pac-Man and pals are on their own world, far more surreal and bizarre thanks to CGI tech.

Let's just give you a tease with the first half of the series opener.



Ghostly Adventures was seemingly dropped by DisneyXD in 2015, but no formal announcement of cancellation was ever made. As noted, it's now on Kids Click, which is experiencing some growing pains in its first few days on the air.

Rating: B+.

Monday, July 3, 2017

Saturday Morning's Forgotten Heroes: Hong Kong Phooey in The Penthouse Burglaries and the Batty Bank Mob (1974)

It's past time we checked back in with Hong Kong Phooey.

This time, Phooey (Scatman Crothers) tangles with an ape trained for second story work in "The Penthouse Burglaries", and "The Batty Bank Mob", a clever gang of crooks who use an assortment of mechanical accessories to pull their jobs. All the while, Phooey, as Penrod Pooch, is tasked with painting the station house. Good luck with that.



Ratiing: B.

Sunday, July 2, 2017

It Should've Been on a Saturday: Gettin' To Know Me (1979-80)

Back in the day, PBS affiliates filled the hours when the kiddo's were at school with an assortment of educational programs aimed at pre-schoolers. The lengths of these programs varied, but the vast majority of these shows have, unfortunately, been lost to the mists of time.

To be totally honest, I didn't even know about this next item, Gettin' To Know Me, which, while it was developed with African-American audiences in mind, is actually meant for everyone. That said, I cannot fairly rate this show, so we will forego the rating, and jump right into a sample episode:

Saturday, July 1, 2017

War of the Aardvarks (Odd Ant Out, 1970)

Here's a rare Ant & the Aardvark in which the ant isn't being chased. Well, technically.

You see, Charlie Ant (John Byner) doesn't show up until the very end, while the Blue Aardvark (Byner) duels with a green one over a can of---wait for it---chocolate covered ants. Some of the gags were boosted from the Road Runner playbook, for obvious reasons.

Here's "Odd Ant Out":



Don't know who Byner was impersonating as the Green Aardvark, in case anyone asks.

Rating: A.

Famous Firsts: Jeannie in Surf's Up (1973)

Our Famous First this month features Jeannie.

As we have previously documented, the series launched three years after NBC's I Dream of Jeannie had ended its run. With the blessing of Screen Gems, Hanna-Barbera rebooted, and transformed Jeannie (Julie McWhirter) into a jealous redhead who had eyes only for her new master, Cory Anders (Mark Hamill), and wouldn't let Cory near any other girl.

In "Surf's Up", Jeannie bulls her way into teaming with Cory for a mixed surfing competition. Jeannie in a bikini? Priceless.



Four years later, H-B had intended to bring Jeannie back for Scooby's All-Star Laff-a-Lympics, but Columbia said no. Only Jeannie's apprentice, Babu (Joe Besser), joined the Scooby-Doobies, and once that series ended after 2 seasons, that would be the end of Babu. Besser ended his run at H-B around the same time, having worked on Yogi's Space Race as well.

Rating: B.